Tag Archives: beef

Il Gran Bollito Misto (Mixed Boiled Meats)

We usually think of boiled meat as a by-product of making broth, a humble if comforting dish for parsimonious souls. But in northern Italy, particularly in the Piemonte and Emilia-Romagna, they’ve transformed boiled meats into a regal spread. Traditionally, a true Gran Bollito Misto includes seven different cuts (tagli) of beef or veal, seven ‘supporting’ […]

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Quick Note: Picchiapò

We’re an old fashioned household in many ways. In the cooler months, making broth is a Sunday afternoon ritual in our house. And from broth comes boiled meat, an old fashioned treat that most people these days have never tasted. If it sounds to you like hospital food, think again. Italian cookery has come up with […]

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Polpettone in umido con funghi (Meatloaf in Tomato and Mushroom Sauce)

As the temperatures dip, I find myself seeking out comfort foods. And what says ‘comfort’ more than a good meatloaf? And, yes, meatloafs do exist in Italian cookery, where they’re called ‘polpettoni‘ or big meatballs. Makes sense, doesn’t it? We’ve already seen Angelina’s southern Italian style meatloaf, stuffed with mozzarella and baked in the oven […]

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Bastille Day Special: Steak au poivre (Peppercorn Steak)

In cooking as in life, simpler is oftentimes better. French cooking may have a reputation for complication, but, in reality, many classic homestyle dishes from “over the Alps” (d’oltralpe, as the Italians refer to things French) are quite simple. To me, there is nothing that quite captures the spirit of simple, unpretensious home cooking in the […]

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Peposo (Peppery Tuscan Beef Stew)

This Tuscan beef stew has a long history. The story goes that it was invented by the furnace workers (fornaciai) who baked the terracotta tiles for the Brunelleschi’s famous Duomo in Florence. They mixed roughly cut up beef shank, salt, lots of black pepper and red wine—Chianti, of course—in terracotta pots and let it all […]

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Carpaccio

Carpaccio is one of the most famous of Italian antipasti but the version most people are familiar with—thin beef slices macerated in olive oil and lemon, adorned with arugula and shavings of Parmesan cheese— is actually more precisely carne cruda all’Albese, a Piedmontese dish. The true carpaccio was invented by Venetian hotelier Giuseppe Cipiani, of Harry’s […]

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Spiedini e arrosticini (Italian Kabobs)

Summer may be drawing to a close here in the Northern Hemisphere, but there’s still time to get in some more grilling. In fact, grilling is a lot more pleasant in the cooler temperatures of the late summer and early fall than at the height of the summer—standing over a hot grill during those ‘dog […]

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