Crostini di fegatini (Tuscan Chicken Liver Crostini)

Frankantipasti, Fall, Toscana15 Comments

Crostini (Tuscan Chicken Liver Crostini)

Crostini di fegatini—bread slices topped with a savory chicken liver paste—are the iconic Tuscan antipasto. In this version from Giuliano Bugialli’s classic work, The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, the liver paste is flavored unusually with  juniper berries, a touch that Bugialli says evokes the autumn hunting season. Whether or not … Read More

Pollo in porchetta (Tuscan Spit Roasted Chicken)

Franksecondi piatti, Toscana20 Comments

Spit Roasted Chicken with Pancetta Stuffing

When I served this dish, several of my dinner guests were wondering what the ‘secret’ ingredient was that gave this Tuscan spit roasted chicken such a special flavor. Of course, rotisserie chicken is almost always wonderfully juicy and luscious, but pollo in porchetta—chicken prepared in the manner of roast suckling pig—is … Read More

Torta di porri (Tuscan Leek Pie)

Frankantipasti, snack, Toscana16 Comments

This recipe for Tuscan leek pie comes from the Florentine chef and food historian Giuliano Bugialli. He is one of my favorite Italian cookbook authors but is relatively little known, particularly as compared with his near contemporary Marcella Hazan. Bugialli produced a number of wonderful cookbooks, some beautifully illustrated, some … Read More

Carabaccia (Tuscan Onion Soup)

Frankprimi piatti, Soups, Toscana, Winter35 Comments

Carabaccia

Carabaccia is an ancient Tuscan onion soup, going back to the Renaissance. They say it was a favorite of Leonardo da Vinci—and that, as for so many other classic dishes,  the recipe was brought by Catarina de’  Medici to France, where it evolved into the soupe à l’oignon we all know and love today. You … Read More

Peposo (Peppery Tuscan Beef Stew)

Franksecondi piatti, Toscana39 Comments

Peposo (Tuscan Beef Stew)

This Tuscan beef stew has a long history. The story goes that it was invented by the furnace workers (fornaciai) who baked the terracotta tiles for the Brunelleschi’s famous Duomo in Florence. They mixed roughly cut up beef shank, salt, lots of black pepper and red wine—Chianti, of course—in terracotta … Read More