Pane casereccio (Homemade Bread)

Pane casereccio (Homemade Bread)

In reference by Frank65 Comments

I am not a baker. Never have been. I have always found stove-top cooking fun and easy but baking is a very different art. Cooking lets you stir and taste and adjust as you go along to get things to come out just right. But with baking—once you close that oven door, your success is in the hands of fate.

But I’ve recently changed my mind, at least when it comes to homemade bread. I was forced into it, in a way, by the indifferent quality of the bread that I can find where I am now living. Even at the ‘fancy’ supermarkets around, and even at the few remaining bakeries in my area, the bread is almost always disappointing—the crust isn’t crusty enough, the crumb too soft and bland and too ‘tight’ as well. What I have been looking for is that bread that I remember appearing on Angelina’s table, large round loaves that she would hold close to her chest and cut with a large knife. That bread was crusty and chewy and delicious, with big holes that were perfect for catching sauce when wiping up sauce on your plate (‘facendo la scarpetta‘ as the they say in Italian). I rediscovered that kind of bread  when I moved to Italy, where it is variously called pane casereccio or pane di casa or (especially in and around Naples) pane cafone. It was cheap and good and ubiquitous, one of the small but wonderful pleasures of Italian life.

When I moved back to the States, I was desperate to find something comparable. After looking around for at least a year, I realized that I might as well be looking for unicorns. The obvious solution was to do what more and more people are doing: make my own. Not being a natural baker, I was amazed that I could do it in the first place. In fact, turns out it is not all that hard to do, especially with the help of a standing mixer.

Over the past year or so, I’ve collected a number of books on bread baking. All of them teach you to make great homemade bread, but just this past Christmas I found gold. Some friends gave me My Bread, by Jim Lahey, founder of the Sullivan Street Bakery in New York. Lahey has developed an excellent, incredibly straight-forward no-knead bread recipe that that turns out a loaf as close to the pane casereccio as anything I’ve tasted since I left Italy.  It really could hardly be easier to pull off—all you need are the ingredients—flour, water, salt and yeast—a good cast-iron casserole and a bit of patience. Oh yes, and an oven. The ‘secret’ of this method lies in giving the dough a very slow initial rise, which eliminates the need for kneading, and the use of the cast-iron casserole or ‘Dutch oven‘, which you preheat in a hot oven to recreate conditions inside that Lahey says are similar to a bakery oven. I’m not expert, but I can say that the crust that forms in that environment is just wonderful.

Ingredients

For a medium loaf

  •  3 cups bread flour (or all purpose flour)
  • 1-1/2 cups cold water
  • 1/4 teaspoon yeast
  • A pinch of salt

Directions

Mix the dry ingredients in the bowl of a standing mixer, using the paddle. Then add the water in a drizzle until a very stick dough has formed. If the dough seems dry, then add a bit more, a spoonful at a time. Take the bowl from the mixer and cover it with a towel and/or a plate and leave it in a warm (but not hot) place over night. Lahey recommends 18 hours (or at few as 12) but I’ve found that 24 hours produces an even better loaf. There’s no problem as long as you think just a little ahead and make mix the dough the day before and let it rise overnight.

[NB: No worries if you don’t have a standing mixer, you can just mix your dough in a normal bowl with a wooden spoon.]

After this initial rise, the dough will have expanded, darkened in color and be spottled with ‘pock marks’ on its surface.

Now scrape the dough out of the bowl with a spatula or wooden spoon onto a lightly floured surface. You will notice that it will have a rather stringy consistency, which is just what you want: this shows how the slow rise has allowed gluten to form even without kneading.

Flour your hands and form the mass of dough into a ball without kneading. Just sort of glance your hands over the surface of the dough, tucking it under itself to round it and smooth its surface. (NB: Use a minimum of flour both on the surface and on your hands, so you don’t incorporate too much into the dough. A wet dough is important to the rustic texture of the bread.)

Then gingerly lay the dough on a lightly floured tea towel, then fold the ends of the towel on top of the dough. Let the bread rise again (this step is called ‘proofing’ by bakers) until it roughly doubles in size, which can take anywhere from 1 to 2 hours. If you have the time, take the whole 2 hours.

About 30 minutes before the second rise is over, preheat your oven to 400F/200C. Put a 4-1/2 or 5-1/2 quart cast iron casserole (about 10″ in diameter) with its cover, in the oven to preheat along with the oven itself. This will act as an oven inside the oven: intensely hot and small enough that it retain the moist atmosphere that really excellent bread needs.

Now you’re ready to bake. This is the one tricky part of the recipe, and just a little dangerous as you’ll need to handle the very hot cast iron casserole. Make sure you have heavy oven mitts (it’ll be too hot for a towel) and proceed with care!

Take the casserole out of the oven using your oven mitt and lay it on a heat-resistant surface. (I use a a turkey carving board with spikes that hold the pot slightly above the surface.) Then remove the cover and lay it aside. Take the towel with the dough and quickly flip the dough into the casserole (it will go in ‘upside down’, which is fine). Shake the casserole, if need be, to center the dough and then quick re-cover it.

Put the casserole back in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Then take it out of the oven and remove the cover. The bread will be ever so slightly browned.

Now put the casserole back into the oven, uncovered, and bake for another 15-20 minutes, until the bread has developed a beautiful golden brown crust.  Turn the bread out onto a cooling rack and leave it until it has completely cooled. (This cooling period is critical, as the crumb (ie, the ‘insides’ of the bread) will continue to cook; you may hear it ‘crackle’ as it does, which means it’s doing its job.

When the bread has cooled completely, after about 45 minutes to an hour, it is ready to enjoy!

Notes

The best flour for making homemade bread is, of course, bread flour. Bread flour has a high gluten (protein) content that produces a nice, firm crumb and crusty crust. These days, with so many people making their own bread, it is fairly easy to find in better supermarkets. It can also be ordered online. But if you like, you can also use all purpose flour; it works almost as well.

As for the casserole, the usual brands, such as Le Creuset, Staub and Lodge, all make the kind of casserole you’ll need. Lahey says he likes Staub the best, and that’s the brand I use as well, but it’s an expensive solution (around $250). Le Creuset has one drawback, which is that the plastic knob on the cover is only guaranteed up to 375F, just under the temperature you need. And since constant baking an empty casserole at high temperatures will, over time, discolor whatever casserole you use, you may just want to opt for the economical choice: the Lodge, which costs only $30.

This recipe for homemade bread is an only slightly revised version of the basic no-knead bread recipe found in My Bread. I’ve upped the water content slightly (as I like a ‘holey’ crumb) and lengthened the initial rise even more, but otherwise this is his recipe. I heartily recommend you buy the book, which is filled with little tips and tricks on not mentioned here.

Post scriptum: You can make a wonderful whole-wheat loaf using the exact same recipe, except using 1 cup whole wheat and 2 cups white bread flour.

Whether whole wheat or not, with more bread-making experience,  I find I like to add more water than Jim’s recipe calls for, up to 2 cups. The resulting dough is very wet: too wet to handle with bare hands, but if you flour the surface and your hands well enough, it will work out fine. There’s a saying, the wetter the dough, the better the bread, and I totally agree! The crumb you get from a very wet dough is fantastically chewy and full of flavor.

Pane integrale (Whole Wheat Bread)
Pane casereccio (Homemade Bread)

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 12 hours

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 12 hours, 45 minutes

Yield: One medium-sized loaf of bread

Pane casereccio (Homemade Bread)

Ingredients

  • 3 cups bread flour (or all purpose flour)
  • 1-1/2 cups cold water
  • 1/4 teaspoon yeast
  • A pinch of salt

Directions

  1. Mix the dry ingredients in the bowl of a standing mixer, using the paddle. Then add the water in a drizzle until a very stick dough has formed. If the dough seems dry, then add a bit more, a spoonful at a time. Take the bowl from the mixer and cover it with a towel and/or a plate and leave it in a warm (but not hot) place over night. [NB: No worries if you don't have a standing mixer, you can just mix your dough in a normal bowl with a wooden spoon.]
  2. Scrape the dough out of the bowl with a spatula or wooden spoon onto a lightly floured surface. Flour your hands and form the mass of dough into a ball without kneading. Gingerly lay the dough on a lightly floured tea towel, then fold the ends of the towel on top of the dough. Let the bread rise again until it roughly doubles in size, which can take anywhere from 1 to 2 hours.
  3. About 30 minutes before the second rise is over, preheat your oven to 400F/200C. Put a 4-1/2 or 5-1/2 quart cast iron casserole (about 10" in diameter) with its cover, in the oven to preheat along with the oven itself.
  4. NB: For the next step: Make sure you have heavy oven mitts (it'll be too hot for a towel) and proceed with care!
  5. Take the casserole out of the oven using your oven mitt and lay it on a heat-resistant surface. Remove the cover and lay it aside. Take the towel with the dough and quickly flip the dough into the casserole (it will go in 'upside down', which is fine). Shake the casserole, if need be, to center the dough and then quick re-cover it.
  6. Put the casserole back in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Then take it out of the oven and remove the cover. (The bread will be ever so slightly browned.)
  7. Put the casserole back into the oven, uncovered, and bake for another 15-20 minutes, until the bread has developed a beautiful golden brown crust. Turn the bread out onto a cooling rack and leave it until it has completely cooled.
  8. When the bread has cooled completely, after about 45 minutes to an hour, it is ready to enjoy!
http://memoriediangelina.com/2012/01/08/pane-casereccio-homemade-bread/
FrankPane casereccio (Homemade Bread)

Comments

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  3. Patrizia

    Hello
    I think you need to use a heavy lid when making this bread.
    It needs to be sealed so the heat inside the pot stays moist.
    It’s like an oven in an oven.
    Patrizia

  4. Rosie

    Hiya, I have just come back from Italy and are eager to try this recipe! I have made up the mixture so will bake tomorrow, but discovered that none of my casserole dishes have lids! Is there anyway to do this without a lid? I don’t want to buy a new casserole dish if I don’t have to!

    Thanks, Rosie

    1. Author
      Frank

      I’ve never tried this method without the lid, but I’m fairly sure that the lid is essential. The point is to create a super-hot and humid environment inside the pot, and without a lid, that wouldn’t happen.

  5. Pingback: Hamburger alla panna (Hamburger with Cream Sauce) | Memorie di Angelina

  6. Rob

    I just found this site and love all the recipes of foods I grew up eating. I do cook and bake breads also. I’ve been making this bread and variations of it along with rolls for over 5 years, since Nov 2008. Lacey along with Mark Bitman put this method on YouTube in 2006.

    1. Rob

      Sorry, I meant Lahey. We love this bread. When I was a kid growing up in Newark, NJ, I use to go to the Italian Bakery for Grandma. We called this “panelle”. She would be cooking her “gravy” and when I came back from the bakery, she would slice the bread and pour gravy on it for me. We like this especially for eggplant parm sandwiches.

    1. Rob

      Since starting to bake breads, especially the no knead method, I find using instant dry yeast works better for me than just dry yeast. Instant does not need to be proofed. I get it at Sam’s Club as Costco only has the dry yeast, not instant. I keep it in the freezer and it keeps forever.

      I also use another no knead method called Artisan Bread in 5. That uses more yeast, but I use that method when using dairy since I do not like leaving dairy on the counter for any length of time.

  7. patrizia

    I will NEVER buy bread again.This is the best bread on Earth
    Thank you Frank.

  8. Tony

    Epic fail today on my first attempt – I’m newer to bread but have been having good luck and wanted to find a recipe similar to Turano Pane. This looked good. put everything together yesterday and put it in my oven to rise with the oven light on since my house is a little cold. This morning there was a crust on top of the dough that I picked off to try and save the dough – then the dough was way to wet and hard to do anything with and stuck to everything and in the end I had to toss it. Going to try again today and see how it works tomorrow. Probably won’t turn the oven light on this time! Here we go again!

    1. Author
      Frank

      Sorry to hear about your experience, Tony! The good thing about this method is that you don’t need a warm environment for the yeast to do its work, given the very long initial rise. Another tip: if you’re dough is forming a crust as it rises, it may be a sign that you should cover the bowl in which it is resting more tightly. I use a plate on top of a towel (as illustrated) to make sure there’s a good seal on the bowl. Better luck next time!

    2. Rob

      As I mentioned, I’ve been making this method a few years now and always with excellent results. You have to follow the instructions for this method as frank mentioned. After mixing, I spray it with Pam and cover with plastic wrap or a shower cap. Only goes on the counter, 12 to 24 hrs, no warm or oven needed. When you dun pit out, use extra flour and dough scrapers to fold the dough as it’s too wet to handle. For the second 2 hr rise, I found something online, letting it proof in a 8″ non stick sauté pan. Than it’s easy to dump in the cast iron Dutch oven. There’s a lot on YouTube about this. Good Luck. Any questions I’d be glad to help. I would post pics of my bread on here, but not sure how.

  9. Rowan Rain

    I am making my first attempt at any bread making with this recipe! It is one the second rise as I write this and I am so nervous!! lol Wish me luck!

  10. Chellet

    Oh my! That bread caught my attention from the thumbnail picture. It looks great and I can only imagine how it smells and tastes. =)

  11. Daniela

    Ciao, Frank!
    I am an italian student in school, and my teacher decided to do a cooking project… hopefully I manage not to burn down my house, ha ha. Anyway, I had a few questions concerning the bread.
    1) Is it made in cast-iron because of flavor or because it’s just a good baking casserole?
    2) If I slice the bread before going to school, since the entire class has to eat it (making it as humiliating as possible if I mess up…) will it effect the bread’s flavor/texture?
    3) after it’s been sliced, how do you recommend storing it?

    Thanks!
    Daniela

    1. Author
      Frank

      Ciao, Daniela!

      The casserole serves to mimic the environment of a super-hot, humid bread oven at home. Some people use pyrex, I understand. Terracotta might work as well—I believe that there is a pugliese bread they make that way—but you’d need to lower the heat a bit, I imagine, to avoid damaging the vessel. The point is to create a very hot and somewhat humid environment, which is ideal for bread baking.

      Slicing the bread will alter its texture, but probably not enough to be noticeable if the bread is to be served within a few hours. Just make sure to wrap the bread loosely in wax paper or a cloth towel, so it won’t dry out too much. Ditto for storing the bread after that.

      Good luck, Daniela!

      Cheers,
      Frank

    2. Elena

      Hi Daniela, I just wanted to add onto what Frank was saying. I’m a baking and pastry student.

      Because this bread is made using a lean dough with a relatively high moisture content and no preservatives, it will not keep well. Even overnight will stale it out some. It might not be the best bread to bake for school unless you don’t mind getting up reeeealllly early.

      Also, whatever you do, do not slice this bread while it is hot. Let it cool completely before slicing. Noy only is eating very warm bread bad for your digestion, it will also damage the structure of the bread.

  12. Julia

    Hi! This is one of my favorite bread recipes and I’ve made it in a Pyrex covered baker — comes out great every time. I’ve followed the original recipe I found a while ago but l loved your suggestion of adding more water for better crumb. One of the most versatile basic recipes — works well with olives, prosciutto, sundried tomatoes — comes out delicious every time. My family demands it every weekend now. Grazie mille!

    1. Author
      Frank

      You’re welcome, Julia! Although I can’t really take credit—it’s Jim Lahey’s recipe except for the extra water and one or two other tips I found useful. Glad you’re enjoying the bread!

  13. Sue Germain

    Frank I have made your recipe for this bread several times & it always comes out great. I purchased a Lodge cast iron, the good ole black one, like my cast iron skillet. As I have learned to do, I keep it well oiled with olive oil to avoid the rust that cast iron can get if it gets wet or when it is washed. I actually made a rosemary bread using your recipe & just added the dried rosemary when I mixed the dry ingredients. BTW, I made your Eggplant Parmagian last night, which I have done before, but this time I sauteed some shrimp, crab meat, onions, red bell pepper, and added it to the layers. It was great. Thanks Frank. You are my go to guy for Italian cooking. I always give you the credit when friends rave about my Italian dishes.

  14. ameliaschaffner

    Frank, what an amazing looking crust and crumb. And I know what you mean about missing Italian breads. One of the things I miss the very most!!!

  15. Melyssa658

    je n’ai jamais testé cette méthode mais j’ai très envie de l’essayer. Je raffole du pain maison. Merci et Bonne Année :)

  16. Dick

    Frank. I finally tried baking a loaf. I was agonizing as we don’t have a casserole anymore and I couldn’t find our Dutch Oven. However, in my searches I found our clay cooker which I discovered, quite by accident, looks like a cloche – a French device for baking. It worked quite well although I still had a tough time flipping the dough into it despite the low sides. The loaf reminded me of those we used to get at Madonia’s on Arthur Avenue

  17. Annie

    Dear Angelina
    I am new to your site and would like to try your Gelato and your bread, but I cannot print a readable recipe. I am in Sydney, Australia and wonder if language is the problem. Please advise.
    Kind regards
    Annie

  18. Jenn Manzella

    I have 11 minutes before the final product comes out of the oven. So far so good! I've been devouring your website and love it. Thank you!

  19. Roman Yaworsky

    Hi Frank, tried this yesterday and the bread turned out superb, next time a little more salt but I suppose that's all down to individual taste. Thanks for the recipe!

  20. Roman Yaworsky

    Hi Frank, tried this yesterday and the bread turned out to be superb, next time a little more salt but I suppose that's all down to taste. Many thanks for this receipe.

  21. Michael

    Hi Frank. Glad that you liked the cookbook. I made a loaf of “Pan co'santi” yesterday, and this morning, I made French toast. I made a slight variation, since we had dried cranberries on hand. Right now I have a loaf of rye rising. I have done the rye before, and this time I added some dried caraway seed. Enjoy your bread.

  22. Anonymous

    The bread I made was OK, but the outside was much paler than this picture, and hard rather than crusty. I think I need an oven thermometre to check if it's actually 400 when it says it.

  23. Anonymous

    I bought a Lodge, a glove, and a sack of King Arthur flour. I plan to try it this weekend. I have several Le Cruesets but I don't want to wreck them. I've tried making bread before and it has consistently failed. So we shall see.

  24. Frank

    That's fantastic, Judy! Glad it turned out so well for you. Of course, we both have Jim Lahey to really thank…

  25. Frank

    Thanks! Yes, it's true, the lack of gadgets is the biggest flaw of this new template. i've been trying to re-build in the same content through the use of Notes but it's not quite the same. Blogger has promised to bring gadgets to Dynamic Views, so I'm hopeful…

  26. Frank

    That's exactly what I was doing and it works very well indeed. This technique is worth a try—it's just so easy!

  27. Amy

    Oh, I also love the layout, have considered this one myself for my blog, but don´t like that there are no gadgets…might try this if Blogspot will allow gadgets sometime…

  28. Amy

    This is embarrassing to admit, especially since I consider myself a pretty good hobby baker, but I´ve never been able to get this bread recipe to turn out for me. It just becomes one big mess so I´ve been reluctant to try it again. Perhaps though that is where I go wrong? I should keep practicing until I get it right…it looks SO good and I imagine it tastes wonderful!! Thanks for sharing, I MIGHT be inspired to try it again :-)
    Warm wishes from Norway :-)

    1. I_Fortuna

      FOR Amy- I know this is late but I did not see where anyone answered your problem. Not knowing the specifics of what you call a “mess”, I can only take a stab at what the problems might be.
      1- Check to see if you yeast is still good
      2-Let this dough rise covered but not oiled in the warmest room (I put mine in the bedroom in the winter)
      3-I let my dough rise 8 to 24 hours ( the longer the rise the more flavorful dough)
      4-Don’t try to knead or handle the dough too much just for a ball, turn it out on parchment and let it rise for 2 to 3 more hours in a warm spot
      5-Lift the parchment up with the dough on it and put it in the dutch oven parchment and all, or if you feel confident just tumble it into the pot
      6-Don’t open the pot until toward the end of baking, this bread is wet and has a lot of moisture that makes the crust nice
      Oh, I use all purpose unbleached flour Gold Medal or King Arthur. When I can get some semolina and durum, I will add them.

      Personally, I have baked this bread on a parchment lined baking sheet and it come out brown and crispy and perfect. I divide the dough into two boule and bake them side by side on the parchment. If the oven has a good seal on it, the bread will turn out perfect.

      It is this type of bread that led me to start baking again. I hope this helps you. This is a great way to make bread. I even make my pizza dough using the no knead method. Best of baking to you ! : )

  29. Trix

    First of all, I am loving the new look! Very cool. Interesting technique here – For a nice oven spring and crust I usually use my baking stone and pour cold water into a hot pan that I place at the bottom of the stove to create steam. But i really like the look of the crust and crumb you've got here. I am going to try this oven within an oven thing!

  30. Frank

    Thanks, friends, for your comments and suggestions. It's great to compare notes! And thanks to @Linda @Etienne and @PolaM for the kinds words about the new format! I rather like it too, as it does allow me to post larger photos which is great, especially for step by step photo posts like this one. The downside is that, at least for now, I've lost the ability to use 'gadgets'—hence no awards, no “like us on Facebook' and, worst of all, no links to the other blogs I love. But Blogger has promised to bring them back soon, so I live in hope.

    @Susan: Do let us know how your first Lahey loaf comes out.

    @Etienne: I haven't had run into the problem of an overdone bottom, or (as one reader has written) with sticking. Perhaps it has something to do with the qualities of the Staub vs. other brands? Don't really know but if I start encountering the problem I know know how to deal with it! Tips are always appreciated, not only for myself but for other readers as well.

    @drick: I've had problems in the past, too, but this book solved them all!

    @PolaM: Thanks for the tip—will definitely check that site out.

  31. PolaM

    I like the new look! great job!

    I also turned to baking for the same reason you did, I still haven't tried this recipe but it is on my list as soon as I get my lodge casserole.

    BTW for bread baking check out Profumo di Lievito (http://profumodilievito.blogspot.com/). It's an Italian blog with foolproof bread recipes. Anything I tried from there turned out more than great! The ciabatta is on that blog is just phenomenal!

  32. drick perry

    they say beauty is in the eye of, something or another… that is one fine looking bread and you are right, it is a doggone shame it is so hard to find a decent loaf of bread these days… even respectable bakeries make bread that is less desirable than that on a commercial shelf…
    I am gonna get the book as I have so many times given up on making bread.. but your post allowed me to rethink and gave me hope…

  33. Susan........

    You convinced me…I just ordered the book. I can make rolls but breads, not so often. This no knead recipe is exactly the inspiration I need to get back to making bread. My husband will be thrilled. Thanks.
    Happy New Year!!

  34. Etienne

    Great new look, Frank. About the bread…I've been baking this bread for a couple of years pretty much as you describe it. The only real difference is this: I found that the bottom of the bread was often over-baked and hard when left in my Lodge Dutch oven for the entire baking time. So, I do everything you mention through the first 30 minutes of baking. Then I take the bread out (and then remove the Dutch oven itself – carefully) and finish the baking on a cookies sheet for about another 20 minutes. The bread is really “set” in the first 30 minutes anyway and this way the bottom is not so dark and hard.

  35. Anonymous

    Hi Frank…Love your blog..I have been making this bread for about two years…one suggestion, do not use a mixer..so much easier with a wooden spoon or a bread/batter spoon as found at King Arthur..I used a Le creuset pan but the enamel was really beaten up with the intense heat…usually recommend the lodge pot,

    Also if you check out serious eats.com…and look up 'better no knead bread” there are some additional suggestions…like a three day proof..etc.

  36. Laura @ Hip Pressure Cooking

    Hi Frank, I love to make my own bread in the winter.. even though I don't *have* to! I got started on the Lahey recipe when it was published in the NY Times, then I improved my technique by using oven paper (as per America's Test Kitchen No-Knead method). I finally progressed to the no-knead bread videos on Breadtopia.com and have a sourdough culture growing in my fridge. I miss, the tough, chewy crust of San Francisco sourdough bread (the real one)!!!

    Your Cast iron casserole looks beautiful! I use a Pyrex casserole with lid – the nice part is that you can see if the dough is getting it's “oven spring” without having to remove the top and let out the precious steam.

    Ciao,

    L

    P.S. I don't recommend pressure cooking bread. ; )

  37. Dianeuk

    I like the idea of a an oven within an oven – I bake quite a lot of bread so I will try this method. As I use fresh yeast I will have to do a bit of working out of quantities.

  38. Ciao Chow Linda

    Frank – I like the new blog look and your photography looks like great too. Once I found Jim Lahey's recipe, all other bread recipes were tossed out the window. The hole-y interior, the crackly crust is unbeatable and you did Lahey proud.

  39. Greg

    That is one gorgeous loaf of bread! I have been playing with method for about a year off and on. I agree with you let it rise for at least 12 hours but longer is better.

  40. Narde Banks

    Hi Frank, Bravo. It is great bread. I have been making it now for about one year. I am glad you found it. I have since expanded and now make 4 sandwich loaves and one or two of these Rustic loaves a week. Still working on success witha Pita loaf. Bread if the stuff of life, right. Congrat's on your creation she is a beauty.

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