Rose di radicchio (Radicchio “Roses” Stuffed with Sausage)

Rose di radicchio

I like to think that I have a good knowledge of Italian cookery but, every once in a while, I stumble on a dish that I’ve never heard of, let alone tried. So it was with a recent blog post from fellow blogger Judy Witts, whose blog Over a Tuscan Stove is one of my favorites. When I saw her recipe for radicchio ‘roses’  stuffed with sausage, taken from a cookbook by a local winemaker, I knew I had to try it. And when I did try it, I knew I had to share it with my readers. Besides the first step—opening up the radicchio into a ‘rose’ so it can hold its stuffing—the recipe could hardly be simpler. And the flavor combination—the sweet and savory sausage playing off the slight bitter radicchio—is truly spectacular. It may not be the prettiest dish I’ve seen, but it is one of the tastiest I’ve tried in quite a while.

Ingredients

For every 2 persons:

  • 1 large radicchio di Chioggia (about 300g/10oz)
  • 2 large mild Italian sausages (about 150g/5oz each) or an equivalent amount of loose sausage meat
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Red wine for deglazing (optional)

Directions

Trim off the off centimeter or so of the radicchio to expose the leaves, then working very gingerly starting from the center, nudge the leaves apart so they begin to spread apart. Continue until the leaves have opened up quite a bit into the semblance of the petals of a burgundy-colored rose. (Don’t rush the operation or you may rip the delicate leaves.)

Squeeze the sausage meat of its casings and, as you go, slip bits here and there among the leaves, pushing the meat down well into the radicchio so it stays in place. Continue until all of the leaves have at least a bit of sausage and the sausage has been used up. Lay the radicchio on a cookie sheet or baking pan. You should wind up with something like this:

Rosa di radicchio (prep)

Drizzle the radicchio ‘rose’ with olive oil and season well. Place it in a moderate oven (180C/350F) for about 30-40 minutes, until the sausage is cooked through and has caramelized, and the tips of the radicchio leaves have crisped and nicely browned as well. (If you have a convection function, use it.)

Serve on a platter, if you like garnished with some raw radicchio leaves for color. If you like, you can deglaze the pan with red wine and drizzle the resulting sughetto over the radicchio.

Notes

There are two main varieties of radicchio. The kind from Chioggia, round with tightly packed leaves a bit like a cabbage, is the kind you want for this dish. (The other kind, from Treviso, is long and slender with loose, delicate leaves. It is wonderful in salads—superior, to my mind, than the Chioggia variety, but not very suitable for stuffing. It is also much harder to find Stateside in any event.)

You can use any sausage you like. The butcher’s counter at my local store had some ‘mild Italian’ sausage, made in-store, seasoned with a bit of garlic and little else; it combined perfectly with the slightly bitter flavor of the radicchio. If your sausage does not have garlic in it already, you can add a bit of minced garlic, or sautéed onion if you prefer. (Judy tells us that the original recipe, in fact, calls for a bit of sautéed onion.)

Both radicchio and sausages vary tremendously in size, so you’ll need to use your good judgment depending on what you find at the market. The radicchio I found this morning was quite large and, when stuffed, provided an ample secondo for two persons. If you find a small one, you may find it only provides for a single portion. Of course, it all depends on how hungry you are and whether you are eating Italian style, with a primo before and some fruit or dessert afterwards. And, of course, you can add more or less sausage as you prefer. I loaded up my ‘rose’ until it fairly groaned with sausage, but you can add much less for a lighter dish. A 1:1 ratio of radicchio to sausage by weight works well.

Rose di radicchio (Radicchio “Roses” Stuffed with Sausage)

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Yield: Each

Rose di radicchio (Radicchio “Roses” Stuffed with Sausage)

Ingredients

  • 1 large radicchio di Chioggia (about 300g/10oz)
  • 2 large mild Italian sausages (about 150g/5oz each) or an equivalent amount of loose sausage meat
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Red wine for deglazing (optional)

Directions

  1. Trim off the off centimeter or so of the radicchio to expose the leaves, then working very gingerly starting from the center, nudge the leaves apart so they begin to spread apart. Continue until the leaves have opened up quite a bit into the semblance of the petals of a burgundy-colored rose. (Don't rush the operation or you may rip the delicate leaves.)
  2. Squeeze the sausage meat of its casings and, as you go, slip bits here and there among the leaves, pushing the meat down well into the radicchio so it stays in place. Continue until all of the leaves have at least a bit of sausage and the sausage has been used up. Lay the radicchio on a cookie sheet or baking pan. You should wind up with something like this:
  3. Rosa di radicchio (prep)
  4. Drizzle the radicchio 'rose' with olive oil and season well. Place it in a moderate oven (180C/350F) for about 30-40 minutes, until the sausage is cooked through and has caramelized, and the tips of the radicchio leaves have crisped and nicely browned as well. (If you have a convection function, use it.)
  5. Serve on a platter, if you like garnished with some raw radicchio leaves for color. If you like, you can deglaze the pan with red wine and drizzle the resulting sughetto over the radicchio.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://memoriediangelina.com/2013/01/14/rose-di-radicchio-radicchio-roses-stuffed-with-sausage/

Tags: , ,

Subscribe

Subscribe to our e-mail newsletter to receive updates.

18 Responses to “Rose di radicchio (Radicchio “Roses” Stuffed with Sausage)”

  1. 23 January 2013 at 13:46 #

    What a nice idea, Frank! And nice presentation.

  2. ameliaschaffner
    21 January 2013 at 09:19 #

    Frank: I have never seen these either. Sounds like the sweetness of the sausage would greatly counterbalance the bitterness of the radicchio. Plus they look interesting.

  3. 21 January 2013 at 09:13 #

    Frank: sounds so interesting. I think the sweetness of the sausage would balance greatly the bitterness of the radicchio

    • 21 January 2013 at 14:54 #

      Indeed it does. An unexpected but very satisfying combination!

  4. 18 January 2013 at 14:58 #

    Hi Frank,

    This is SUCH a terrific idea. Leave it to Judy to promote a trend. I have never seen this, but now after seeing your version. I really must give it a go. Thanks for the inspiration. It is good, is it not, to see something quite new?

  5. 15 January 2013 at 08:57 #

    Wow Frank, this looks absolutely gorgeous and delicious

    • 17 January 2013 at 08:31 #

      Thanks. It really *tasty*. Props to Judy for finding this little-known gem!

  6. 14 January 2013 at 20:31 #

    oh my goodness, I can smell the sausage cooking, the sound of the radicchio crisping away in the sausage renderings and the experience of that wonderful first bite… hey, I love sausage, don’t ya know.
    This is a simple recipe, yet I know with a very pleasing taste … and I have not heard of it either. Makes me wonder of the technique using other vegetables .

    • 17 January 2013 at 08:32 #

      Thanks, Drick! I have to say, the aroma wafting around the house while this was baking in the oven really was enticing….

      And, I agree, I bet you could do the same with any number of vegetables. Hard to go wrong with sausage!

  7. 14 January 2013 at 12:26 #

    Interesting – I was sure you were going to cook the sausage first – then add it and then briefly bake. I love that this is new. And you are giving us roses in January.

    • 17 January 2013 at 08:34 #

      Thanks, Claudia! I bet using cooked sausage—bound together with eggs and cheese and breadcrumbs, for example—would also be delicious and perhaps a bit lighter. But this technique was really meaty and delicious. And *very* easy.

  8. 14 January 2013 at 04:02 #

    I had never heard of this recipe either, although I live in Italy! It sounds delicious (love the contrast between pork and cooked radicchio in any recipe) and I will definitely be trying it.

    • 17 January 2013 at 08:35 #

      Thanks! Do let us know how you like it! (I bet you will….)

  9. 14 January 2013 at 01:47 #

    un’accoppiata di sapori originale e sorprendente Frank, non sarà bellissima ma di certo il sapore deve essere ottimo, buona settimana! Un abbraccio…

    • 17 January 2013 at 08:38 #

      Grazie, Chiara! E’ tutto merito di Judy, è stata lei a trovare la ricetta…. Buona settimana anche a tè!

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: